EXERCISE 4.2 – STORYBOARDING

Before starting this exercise I had a look at ‘Storyboards’ in the Book, ‘Graphic Design, The New Basics‘ By Lupton E. and Phillips J.C: “Since motion design can be labour-intensive, designers must plan carefully every aspect of a piece before production begins. once a concept is developed, the script is fleshed out with storyboard sketches and a style frame. these visual tools are essential for designing commercials, online banners, television broadcast animations, and film title sequences. Storyboards summarise the content or key moments of an animation’s events. Storyboarding also determines the flow of the storyline and suggests the major changes of action. In addition to movements, the personality, emotions, and gestures of the characters and objects are also expressed. The layout of a storyboard, similar to that of a comic strip, consists of sketches or illustrations displayed sequentially to visualise an animated or live-action piece. Notes describing camera angles, soundtrack, movement, special effects, timing, and transitions between scenes are often included.”

For this exercise, I decided to use a 15 minute part of one of my favourite ‘Friends’ episodes. Even though I have watched random episodes from “Friends” several times throughout the years, I still find it hilarious. I watch it when I’m happy, sad or when I just want to relax.

I watched the 15 minutes’ pieces on Netflix which was easy to ‘forward’/ ‘rewind’ as necessary to view the different angles. Before starting I drew out thumbnail frames in my sketchbook. I continued to ‘pause’ to draw and ‘play’ the program as I drew the different ‘points of view’ in the frames as they ‘played out’.

I drew in cartoon-style using micron pen and later replayed it to add colour using Sakura moonlight gel ink pens.

REFLECTION:

HOW DID THE TASK BENEFIT YOUR DRAWING DEVELOPMENT?

It encouraged my to draw faster, to focus on the most important parts necessary to portray a story, instead of getting overwhelmed by detail. It taught me to use different angles in my drawings instead of just drawing everything at the same angle/ size. Differentiating in size/ zooming/ close – ups/ birds’ eye view/ etc. helps to grab the viewers’ attention and focusing the attention on different aspects of a story. It creates momentum/ anticipation/ excitement.

HOW DID SHIFTS IN ANGLE AND VIEWPOINT ADD TO THE NARRATIVE?

It was a fun activity to explore how different angles are used to narrate a story. The way the camera “zooms” in and out to focus on different things/ aspects in order to create the desired effect to accentuate/ highlight/ add anticipation. It helped to focus the viewers’ attention to different detail/ characters to create different effects.

WHAT ABOUT YOUR OBSERVATIONAL SKILLS AND UNDERSTANDING OF THE CINEMATOGRAPHY?

It taught me to draw fast and to focus on different angles, instead of precision. It taught me how to attempt at creating a story layout using different angles in order to create a more lively narrative (drama effect).

STORYBOARDS:

NAME: Juanita du Toit

STUDENT NUMBER: 522438

COURSE: Illustration 1: Illustration Sketchbooks

The Open College of the Arts (University for the Creative Arts)

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